Keyword targeting NE BROAD_MATCH vs. EQ NEGATIVE_KEYWORD


#1

What is the difference between NE BROAD_MATCH keyword targeting and EQ NEGATIVE_KEYWORD keyword targeting?

I need to advise traffickers on how best to exclude keywords for brand safety purposes. Should they use EQ NEGATIVE_KEYWORD and EQ NEGATIVE_KEYWORD_PHRASE? Or, should they use the NE operator with the other keyword targeting options? The effect we want is to prevent these campaigns from ever running in contexts where these keywords appear.


Ads API Version 3
#2

Similarly… a user used the “import keywords” feature and wants to exclude certain keywords… so he entered “-keyword” (for example).

The targeting criteria that that creates is a UNORDERED_KEYWORD NE criteria, and is pulled down into our system that way. Is that significantly different from an EQ NEGATIVE_KEYWORD criteria?


#3

Thanks for the question, @chris_august7.

First, some context.

Possible keyword-based values include:

  • BROAD_KEYWORD
  • EXACT_KEYWORD
  • UNORDERED_KEYWORD
  • PHRASE_KEYWORD
  • NEGATIVE_EXACT_KEYWORD
  • NEGATIVE_UNORDERED_KEYWORD
  • NEGATIVE_PHRASE_KEYWORD

These can be used with both the POST accounts/:account_id/targeting_criteria and and PUT accounts/:account_id/targeting_criteria endpoints.

EQ and NE are operator_type-specific enums. The operator_type parameter is only available for the POST batch/accounts/:account_id/targeting_criteria endpoint. Because it’s possible to specify EQ or NE with this endpoint, the only supported targeting types are: BROAD_KEYWORD, EXACT_KEYWORD, UNORDERED_KEYWORD, and PHRASE_KEYWORD.

You can get the negative keyword targeting types as follows:

NEGATIVE_EXACT_KEYWORD = {"targeting_type":"EXACT_KEYWORD","operator_type":"NE"}
NEGATIVE_UNORDERED_KEYWORD = {"targeting_type":"UNORDERED_KEYWORD","operator_type":"NE"}
NEGATIVE_PHRASE_KEYWORD = {"targeting_type":"PHRASE_KEYWORD","operator_type":"NE"}

Hope this helps!


NEGATIVE_BEHAVIOR not supported on Batch Targeting Criteria Endpoint
#4

perfect. i’ll save this info away for later reference.