How to Post to Multiple Accounts from One Developer Account


#1

Our company has a weather information platform where we set up weather stations and weather cameras at schools and universities across the US. Each weather station gets its own Facebook page and Twitter account that gets automatically updated throughout the day with useful weather alerts and bulletins as well as educational content to help build weather literacy. Our program was recognized in Florida as the winner of the Innovation Award at the 2016 Florida Governor’s Hurricane Conference and our real-time social media alerts and bulletins were an important part of the preparations and response to Hurricanes Hermine, Matthew, Irma, Florence, and Michael.

We used to simply create a new Twitter account and manage the API credentials for each account in our database for automated posting but that model has changed with the recent implementation of the developer accounts.

I read in another forum post that it is possible to have one developer account that is able to post to multiple twitter usernames but I am struggling with understanding how that would work.

It mentioned you’d use the consumer key and consumer secret key of the developer account combined with the access token and access token secret of the account you were trying to act on behalf of.

My understanding was in order to even have an access token and access token secret, the account needs to be associated with an active developer account.

We had up until now been attempting to have a separate developer account for each new Twitter username associated with a new weather station but have quickly ran into a road block.

I’d welcome any assistance in helping us get over this hurdle.


#2

It is true that you can generate an access token and secret within your Twitter app to be used by the owning user. Users do not, however, need to have a developer account nor a Twitter app for you to generate an access token for them. Even if the user does have a developer account and Twitter apps, you would not be able to use any of their access tokens that they generate from their Twitter apps, because those tokens are meant to be used with their respective Twitter apps.

To make a request on behalf of another user, you need to generate a new set of user access tokens that are specifically meant to be used by your Twitter app. To generate these access tokens, you must use the 3-legged oAuth flow, and have the user authenticate or authorize your Twitter app. The last step in the 3-legged oauth flow provides you a set of access tokens that you can use along with your consumer key and secret to make a request on behalf of that user with your Twitter app.

You should be able to do all of your development for a single organization with one developer account. If you have a single organization with multiple use cases, please create and use different Twitter apps for those different use cases.


#3

Thank you for this guidance and leadership. We were able to figure this out thanks to this information and were able to automate the generation of the necessary tokens.

We are curious as to Twitter’s terms. How many individual Twitter screen names can a single app update in a given amount of time?

As of now we have well over 300 individual weather station Twitter screen names and that number is going to increase continuously.

We are concerned about running into limits imposed on an individual app.

Thanks again.


#4

The only limit that you might run into here is our rate limits related to our POST endpoints. You can read more about this in the following forum announcement:

Other than that, you should be good to go!

Happy developing!